Meanwhile, at the end of May, the French in power, who made themselves available to the armed forces, continued to expect that the British would be replaced by French troops in Syria, even though they had argued over the exact geographical boundaries of these forces and, more generally, at the expense of relations; After the 21st meeting, Lloyd George Clemenceau had written and cancelled the Long-Bérenger oil agreement (revised version agreed at the end of April), which claimed that he did not know or want it to become a subject, while Clemenceau claimed that this had not been the subject of a dispute. There were also discussions about what was agreed or not at the private meeting between Clemenceau and Lloyd George last December. [96] [97] In his introduction to a symposium on Sykes-Picot in 2016, law professor Anghie notes that much of the agreement entrusts “trade and trade agreements, access to ports and railway construction.” [50] More than a year after the agreement with Russia, British and French representatives, Sir Mark Sykes and François Georges Picot, drafted another secret agreement on the future prey of the Great War. Picot represented a small group determined to ensure control of Syria for France; For his part, Sykes asked the UK to compensate for the influence in the region. The agreement did not allow, to a large extent, the future growth of Arab nationalism, which the British government and army wanted to use at the same time for their advantage vis-à-vis the Turks. The agreement was originally used directly as the basis for the 1918 Anglo-French modus vivendi, which provided a framework for the Occupied Enemy Territory Administration in the Levant. More generally, it was to lead indirectly to the subsequent partition of the Ottoman Empire after the Ottoman defeat of 1918. Shortly after the war, French Palestine and Mosul ceded to the British. Warrants in the Levant and Mesopotamia were awarded at the San Remo conference in April 1920, according to the Sykes-Picot framework; The British mandate for Palestine ran until 1948, the British mandate for Mesopotamia was to be replaced by a similar treaty with compulsory Iraq, and the French mandate for Syria and Lebanon lasted until 1946.